AskDefine | Define elegiac

Dictionary Definition

elegiac adj
1 resembling or characteristic of or appropriate to an elegy; "an elegiac poem on a friend's death"
2 expressing sorrow often for something past; "an elegiac lament for youthful ideals"

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Pronunciation

  • a Canada /ˌɛləˈdʒaɪˌæk/ or /ˌɛləˈdʒaɪək/

Adjective

  1. Of, or relating to an elegy.
  2. Expressing sorrow or mourning.

Extensive Definition

Elegiac refers either to those compositions that are like elegies or to a specific poetic meter used in Classical elegies. The Classical elegiac meter has two lines, making it a couplet: a line of dactylic hexameter, followed by a line of dactylic pentameter. Because the hexameter line is in the same meter as epic poetry, and because the elegiac form was always considered lower style than epic, elegists frequently wrote with epic in mind and positioned themselves in relation to epic.

Classical Poets

The first examples of elegiac poetry in writing come from classical Greece. The form dates back nearly as early as epic, with such authors as Archilocus and Simonides of Ceos from early in the history of Greece. One of the most influential elegiac writers, however, was Callimachus from the Hellenistic period, who had an enormous impact on Roman poets, both elegists and non-elegists alike. He promulgated the idea that elegy, shorter and more compact than epic, could be even more beautiful and worthy of appreciation.
The foremost elegiac writers of the Roman era were Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus, and Ovid. Catullus, a generation earlier than the other three, influenced his younger counterparts greatly. They all, particularly Propertius, drew influence from Callimachus, and they also clearly read each other and responded to each other's works. Notably, Catullus and Ovid wrote in non-elegiac meters as well, but Propertius and Tibullus did not.
In other examples of poetry such as Tennyson's The Lady of Shalott an elegaic tone can be used, where the author is prasising someone in a sombre tone

English Poets

The "elegy" was originally a classical form with few English examples. However, in 1751, Thomas Gray wrote Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard http://www.thomasgray.org/cgi-bin/display.cgi?text=elcc. That poem inspired numerous imitators, and soon both the revived Pindaric ode and "elegy" were commonplace. Gray used the term "elegy" for a poem of solitude and mourning, and not just for funereal (eulogy) verse. He also freed the elegy from the Classical elegiac meter.
Afterward, Samuel Taylor Coleridge argued that the elegiac is the form "most natural to the reflective mind," and it may be upon any subject, so long as it reflects on the poet himself. Coleridge was quite aware of the fact that his definition conflated the elegiac with the lyric, but he was emphasizing the recollected and reflective nature of the lyric he favored and referring to the sort of elegy that had been popularized by Gray. Similarly, William Wordsworth had said that poetry should come from "emotions recollected in tranquility" (Preface to Lyrical Ballads, emphasis added). After the Romantics, "elegiac" slowly returned to its narrower meaning of verse composed in memory of the dead.
elegiac in French: Élégiaque

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

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